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Halloween (2018)

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  • Originally posted by Westin View Post
    Curtis openly admitted to Variety magazine that H20 was just a money gig for her. It started with good intentions, she said, but eventually she did the movie just for the money, she admitted. Thus, I very much doubt that she has watched H4-H6 or has any interest in watching them. She didn't want to be in "Resurrection," either. She only accepted being in "Resurrection" because there was a clause stating that writers cannot kill Michael Myers and that H20 had to have a sequel of some sort. Back then, she vehemently opposed reprising her role as Laurie Strode in any Halloween movie and that's why her character got killed. While it's true that Laurie Strode was Curtis's first role in a movie and that the role helped her career, I don't really think that she cares about the franchise as a whole.
    It just does to show how selfish she is, but she's apparently willing to come back as Laurie for the money and if she's contracted to do so. She did H:R because she wanted closure for her character if Michael was still going to be around and she was contracted to do at least thirty seconds of filming. Thirty seconds? That's like Gina Phillips' role at the end of Jeepers Creepers 3 and that was just abrupt and weak. I'm glad the writers talked her into doing more than what, but they certainly could have executed it better. Laurie needing to unmask Michael to be sure it's him and this dude was literally trying to KILL you? Does it freaking matter if it was him or not?
    Originally posted by Westin View Post
    Well, don't quote me on this, but if memory doesn't fail me... someone who used to post here said that it was Curtis who opposed the scene. Although she was not a producer, I think she had some creative control over the movie.
    She certainly had creative control over the ending with Michael's death, but a one scene reference to movies she haven't even seen? How was that gonna hurt the movie in any way? Seems hard to swallow there. I just know they had trouble figuring out why Laurie left Jamie in Haddonfield and took John with her so they decided to just retcon the whole thing. That would cancel out Jamie's rumored distaste for that scene. It just sucks they really couldn't get around that like it's not so freaking hard. Shows how dumb and mind limited these so-called professionals really are.
    Originally posted by Westin View Post
    Have you guys ever written a script, Darth Reaper and Devonte Huntley?
    I'm surprised you're asking me this given the posts I've made on this thread and Child's Play where I state I wrote screenplays. I've written many. My first screenplay in 2009 which was a Halloween sequel to Part 6. I was fifteen and the script unfortunately was lackluster at best. I re-did it, but that copy is long lost forever. I wrote my second screenplay in 2015 which was my second Halloween one which connected the first eight movies minus H3. Some time later I wrote a Child's Play screenplay which is a direct sequel to Curse of Chucky. This was in 2016. Both the second Halloween script and Child's Play one was 500 pages and this is with the number font being small so the regular 12 level one might bump those pages up to like 700+. I had no idea how many pages a screenplay is suppose to have and when I did, I found it difficult to construct a story that's only like 90-120 pages with a 12 font on top of it like what? In 2016 as well I started to write a sequel to my Halloween story as well as a Final Destination story, but I got a few pages into each and stopped and neither story has been touched since. In 2017 I wrote a Scream 5 screenplay which was 240+ pages, much shorter than my previous two but still too long. I ended up having to break that up in two parts so you have a Scream 5 and 6. There was suppose to be a sequel to I guess Scream 6 (which would have been the original 6) but when I get done tweaking the second half, I'm gonna wrap the storyline up there. I have yet to do that since I began focusing on my original screenplays. I did the same sort of breaking apart when I wrote a new Chucky sequel following Cult of Chucky and the thing was too long so I split that up into two stories. The whole thing was "Son of Chucky" but the first part was still titled as that but the second half became "Ghost of Chucky". I talk about this in the Child's Play thread. I started that in the end of 2017 and it carried over into 2018. This year I started crafting my original horror series cleverly using material from my previous scripts. My first screenplay became an original thing with tweaks. The sequel is entirely lifted from a storyline in my second Halloween script, the new Part 1 to both those entries will be lifted from a short-story I wrote in middle school, and Part 4 and 5 will be recycled out of what is completely out of my unfinished Halloween and Final Destination scripts. As far as using my FD story, I'm still indifferent about because I do like the story I crafted for that series as it's fresh and different and want the next movie to have a story like that. Not sure I want to rob a good sequel idea to connect it to be part of my original series, but we'll see. But there is my journey. Then there's the new Halloween 9 script I started this year and got thirty pages in which will lift material from my second Halloween script I also need to get back on shortly.

    As we stand I have nine completed screenplays, three unfinished and one near completion. I'm also planning to write a Freddy Vs. Jason 2, a Halloweentown 5, and a possible When a Stranger Calls 3 (sequel to the 1979 movie and it's 1993 sequel).
    Originally posted by Westin View Post
    If not, you should study the basics of screenwriting and write your own film scripts. It's the only way to get those ideas turned into actual movies. I hear it's a very difficult field, but the good news is that you don't have to go to film school to become a screenwriter (especially nowadays); there are many resources you can find online (classes on YouTube), used books you can order from Amazon, scripts of your favorite movies that you can use as a template, and virtually anything you need to perfect your art. In other words, if you have a dream, just don't sit there.
    I tried Amazon Studios when it came to my fan stuff and got rejected. I could see why considering they were too long or not formatted right or not well written though the stories were really interesting. A few months ago Amazon apparently stated they were gonna stop accepting screenplays and it seemed permanent. Not sure how it is now. But it's tough. I went to college for creative writing and flunked out without a degree and haven't been back to school since. Perhaps if I had a degree it would make this screenwriting connection thing easier and if I was living in Los Angeles. I have found one site that could accept submissions that didn't cost any money. They have a deadline by the 15th of this month for submissions.

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    • Originally posted by DevonteHuntley View Post

      I tried Amazon Studios when it came to my fan stuff and got rejected. I could see why considering they were too long or not formatted right or not well written though the stories were really interesting. A few months ago Amazon apparently stated they were gonna stop accepting screenplays and it seemed permanent. Not sure how it is now. But it's tough. I went to college for creative writing and flunked out without a degree and haven't been back to school since. Perhaps if I had a degree it would make this screenwriting connection thing easier and if I was living in Los Angeles. I have found one site that could accept submissions that didn't cost any money. They have a deadline by the 15th of this month for submissions.
      How old are you now and do you plan on going back to college? I don't think one necessarily needs a degree to master skills like mass communication and social media. Oren Peli was a computer software engineer and he decided to make a movie, Paranormal Activity. He shot the movie with a home video camera. The movie cost him only $15,000 and it earned nearly $108 million at the U.S. box office. I think the key to success (and this applies to everyone, not only filmmakers) is intent, motivation, and discipline. I know a lot of people with all sorts of degrees (especially non-technical degrees) who do not work in their chosen fields (the arts and the humanities) or are underemployed. I think our generation is lucky. For example, it's far easier to make a short film right now and have the film reach hundreds of thousands of people than in the past. We have YouTube, Facebook, Instagram. The possibilities are endless --I think you just have to believe in yourself, be persistent, and never give up.

      Have you thought of running a blog and writing movie reviews?

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      • Originally posted by Westin View Post
        Have you guys ever written a script, Darth Reaper and Devonte Huntley?

        If not, you should study the basics of screenwriting and write your own film scripts. It's the only way to get those ideas turned into actual movies. I hear it's a very difficult field, but the good news is that you don't have to go to film school to become a screenwriter (especially nowadays); there are many resources you can find online (classes on YouTube), used books you can order from Amazon, scripts of your favorite movies that you can use as a template, and virtually anything you need to perfect your art. In other words, if you have a dream, just don't sit there.
        Nope. I've never written a script before. Honestly, if I was going to try my hand at something like that I would love to work with someone who has experience with that sort of thing and shares my interests. I think that would be most helpful for me. Having someone to actually take me through the process would probably be more educational for me than just trying to read a book and do it all by myself.

        As for trying to do it for a living, I'm a bit conflicted over it. The thought of taking an idea of mine and turning it into something real appeals to me, but I'm not sure I'm cut out for dealing with the Hollywood system. Just for starters, I'd want perhaps more control over my stories than I could reasonably hope to get from Hollywood.

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        • I'm just returning from seeing it, finally, and I'm very warm on it. Glad I was able to see it in the theater 5 years after seeing the rerelease of the original.

          Happy times.

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          • Originally posted by Westin View Post
            How old are you now and do you plan on going back to college? I don't think one necessarily needs a degree to master skills like mass communication and social media.
            I am twenty-four now. I don't necessarily need a degree, but it surely would help achieve my goal better and quicker. At the rate I am now, I'd have to wait.
            Originally posted by Westin View Post
            Oren Peli was a computer software engineer and he decided to make a movie, Paranormal Activity. He shot the movie with a home video camera. The movie cost him only $15,000 and it earned nearly $108 million at the U.S. box office.
            Yeah, it's amazing what that guy was able to do. Too bad the studios got involved and butchered it and then made ridiculous prequels with higher budgets and typical standard horror nonsense from the modern era. This is why studios need to stay out of independent projects. But like I said, I have no degree, have no published work, and live in Buffalo. Even the best authors out there have been rejected so imagine what struggle I'm gonna be dealing with.
            Originally posted by Westin View Post
            I think our generation is lucky. For example, it's far easier to make a short film right now and have the film reach hundreds of thousands of people than in the past. We have YouTube, Facebook, Instagram. The possibilities are endless --I think you just have to believe in yourself, be persistent, and never give up.
            I can try, but I'm not gonna be getting my hopes up in case it's all gonna be a waste of time in the end. I'm basically gonna be waving the ride and wait for luck to pop up I guess.
            Originally posted by Westin View Post
            Have you thought of running a blog and writing movie reviews?
            I've written movie reviews years ago, but it was very few and short and this was before wanting to become an author and a screenplay writer. I did them on IMDb. I do not want to really do that. I'm not a critic and frankly, most readers would not like what I have to say about these movies.

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